Saturday, November 22, 2014

How do I file a complaint against a mental health care facility/professional?

As documented on the NAMI Website FAQ section

Complaints about an individual physician/psychiatrist: 


If the physician/psychiatrist works for a hospital or agency, you may contact the doctor's supervisor. You can also file a complaint with the state medical board or the American Psychiatric Association (APA) (some psychiatrists are members, some are not). The APA might also refer you to its APA District Branch or state psychiatric society.

Complaints about other mental health professionals: 


If employed by a hospital or agency, you may file complaints with the therapist's supervisor, the hospital ombudsman or the administrator. Therapists are regulated by their licensing boards (e.g. the state board of health and mental hygiene, counseling or other licensing board). They may also be members of their professional associations (such as the National Association of Social Workers, the American Psychological Association, etc.). Your NAMI State Organization may have the appropriate number and listing.

Abuse or neglect in an institutional setting: 


Protection and Advocacy Agencies advocate on behalf of individuals with mental illness who are in institutional settings (such as jails, correctional facilities or state psychiatric hospitals); allegations of abuse or neglect are one of their top priorities.

Complaints of abuse, neglect or mistreatment in the hospital setting:


As mentioned above, you may file a complaint directly to the hospital ombudsman or administrator.

Or, you may contact The Joint Commission (formerly known as JCAHO, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations) online or call their toll-free Compliant Hotline at (800) 994-6610 to share concerns regarding quality of care. The Joint Commission accredits hospitals, home health agencies, nursing homes, outpatient clinics, behavioral health care programs and managed care plans among others. Complaints should be related to patient rights, quality of care, safety, infection control, medication use and/or security. They are unable to assist with billing, insurance or payment disputes.

Complaints about a CMHC (community mental health center):


You may file a complaint with the state mental health agency. Medicaid and Medicare recipients with complaints about CMHCs have the following options: Medicare beneficiaries may contact the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) regional Medicaid Service and the state Peer Review Organization. Medicaid beneficiaries may contact the state Medicaid official, and perhaps the state medical review board could help.

Friday, November 21, 2014

What’s Behind the Dramatic Decline in ECT Treatment Over the Past 15 Years?

As Reported in the Psychiatric News.

Here are some of the highlights:

There has been a dramatic decline in the use of electroconvulsive therapy in U.S. general hospitals over the past 15 years.

[...]

This finding comes from a study published online October 10 in Biological Psychiatry. The lead researcher was Brady Case, M.D., an assistant professor of psychiatry at Brown University and director of the Health Services Research Program at Bradley Hospital in East Providence, R.I.

The study conducted by Case and his colleagues appears to be the first study on the use of inpatient ECT in U.S. general hospitals since 1992. They examined trends in the use of ECT in a national hospital sample over a 17-year period from 1993 to 2009. The hospitals were nonfederal, short-term general or specialty hospitals, including both public and private facilities and academic medical centers. However, freestanding psychiatric hospitals were excluded. In their paper, Case and his coworkers referred to all of the analyzed hospitals as “general hospitals.”

Here are several of their most salient findings:

  • The percentage of general hospitals conducting ECT decreased from 15 percent to 11 percent, and the percentage of hospitals with psychiatric units conducting ECT decreased from 55 percent to 35 percent.
  • The number of stays in general hospitals involving ECT rose from 1993 to 1995 from 13/100,000 residents to 16/100,000 residents, but then fell gradually after that, to 7/100,000 residents in 2009. This decline appeared to be due, to a large extent, to reduced use of ECT with elderly patients, a group traditionally thought to benefit most from it. (?!!)
  • For inpatients with severe recurrent depression, the percentage whose treating hospitals conducted ECT fell from 71 percent to 45 percent.
  • Throughout the study period, depressed inpatients from poor neighborhoods and those who were publicly insured or uninsured were less likely to receive care from hospitals conducting ECT.

The data strongly support the impression that psychiatric units of general hospitals are ceasing to conduct ECT and that this is driving the decline in the number of patients receiving ECT,” Case told Psychiatric News. But why are hospitals dropping the procedure?

Possible explanations, Case said, are “growing pressures to avoid the inpatient treatment costs and length of stay associated with ECT and declining familiarity and more negative attitudes toward the procedure among providers and patients…. We didn’t have information on provider and patient attitudes, but as more facilities cease conducting ECT, we can expect that fewer clinicians and inpatients will be exposed to the option…. On the other hand, it is clear that popular perceptions of mental illness are increasingly biological, and where ECT is conducted, there has been no decline in patients electing to receive it.”

[...]

The findings have widespread implications, Case believes. For example, “most Americans admitted to general hospitals for severe, recurrent depression are now being treated in facilities that do not conduct ECT. This is the consequence of a solid 15-year trend in which psychiatric units appear to be discontinuing use of the procedure…. If the trends of the last 15 years hold, the number and proportion of general hospital psychiatric units conducting ECT will continue to decline, and fewer people will receive it.”

He added that regulations expected to be issued by the FDA will influence how ECT is used in the future, “but as far as I know, the decision about how to classify ECT devices is still pending. If the FDA follows its panel recommendation and ultimately retains Class III—high risk—status for ECT devices, then I would expect the decline to accelerate.”

[...]

Psychiatry In Decline: 55% of psychiatrists are over 55 and getting close to retirement age.

I stumbled across this article from a couple of years ago just recently, and wanted to share this snippet

While 37.6% of practicing physicians are age 55 or older, in psychiatry nearly 55% are in this age range, ranking as the second oldest group of physicians, surpassed only by preventive medicine.

Part of this aging cohort effect is the low rate of medical school graduates choosing psychiatry. Only 4% of US medical school seniors (n = 698) applied for one of the 1097 post-graduate year one training positions in psychiatry.

As Dr. Roberts noted, it is troubling that the area of medicine addressing the leading source of medical disability is also facing a shortage of new talent.

Indeed, over the past decade the number of psychiatry training programs has fallen (from 186 to 181) and the number of graduates has dropped from 1,142 in 2000 to 985 in 2008. In spite of the national shortage of psychiatrists, especially child psychiatrists, 16 residency training programs did not fill with either U.S. or foreign medical graduates in 2011.

Beyond these numbers, the profession is struggling with its identity, a theme echoed in other plenary talks at the APA meeting.

Traditionally, psychiatry has been the medical discipline that cultivates a rich relationship with patients, countering suffering with empathy and understanding. But a recent article in the New York Times reported that only 11% of psychiatrists perform psychotherapy and described a psychiatrist who ran his office “like a bus station,” seeing so many patients for 5 -10 minute medication checks that he had to train himself not to listen to his patient’s problems.
ref:New York Times, March 5, 2011, “Talk Doesn’t Pay, So Psychiatry Turns Instead to Drug Therapy”

Half of psychiatrists do not take insurance

As seen in this report

We found that almost half of psychiatrists take don't take health insurance – whether it's private health insurance, Medicare (insurance for the elderly), or Medicaid (insurance for the poor).

Specifically, we found that in 2009 to 2010, only 55% of psychiatrists took private health insurance, 55% took Medicare and 43% took Medicaid. This presents a significant barrier for patients who need to see psychiatrists.

It's important to emphasize that this was a sharp contrast to every other type of doctor. For example, 94% of cardiologists took private health insurance during that same time period and 95% of general internists took Medicare. When pooled together, 88% of physicians all specialties other than psychiatry took private health insurance and 86% took Medicare. Acceptance rates for Medicaid were low overall because reimbursement rates are low. Nevertheless, psychiatrists had some of the lowest Medicaid acceptance rates of all specialties.

The results shocked us and when our study was published last year, we learned that the results also shocked the general public.

Doctors, patients and reporters corroborated our findings. I started to hear more and more stories of patients who struggled to find a psychiatrist who took their insurance.
LINK to Study in JAMA

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Psychiatric patient awarded $40,000 after sexual assault at Seven Oaks Hospital in Manitoba

From this report from CBC news

A former unit clerk at Seven Oaks Hospital has been ordered to pay a patient $40,000 in damages after an investigation found the clerk sexually interfered with her.

According to court documents, in December of 2010 the woman, who is now 42, had a panic attack and was admitted to the psychiatric ward at Seven Oaks. She was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and was being treated for anxiety, depression and alcoholism.

Within days of being admitted, she loaned a DVD to a male unit clerk. The man returned the DVD to her with his number enclosed. She says he openly read her medical files and another patient told her she thought the clerk was flirting with her.

A few days later, the clerk smuggled a cell phone onto the ward for the woman. A statement filed by the woman claims he began texting her sexually provocative messages. He also told her that he loved her and would "always be there for her."

On one occasion he followed her into her room and they kissed. They also met in his vehicle parked outside the hospital for a rendezvous. She applied for a day pass and he drove her to a liquor store and a hotel. Once inside a rented room, they drank large amounts of alcohol and had sex. The next weekend she applied for another pass and they checked in to a CanadInns Hotel and drank large amounts of alcohol.

The following Monday, the patient checked herself out of hospital and the unit clerk stopped texting her and returning her calls. On December 24th, she received a phone call from the man's common-law wife asking her to stop contacting him. The woman says she didn't know the clerk had a partner.

As the woman's condition improved, she realized what had happened and believed her judgment was impaired and the clerk took advantage of her.

A provincial investigation report filed in November of 2011 found that the patient was vulnerable at the time of admission to the facility. It states: "There is evidence that the patient was subjected to sexual abuse by the respondent who was a staff member during her hospitalization and that this abuse caused the patient harm."

The investigation report directs Seven Oaks to "develop and implement an educational strategy for professional boundaries and include all direct care staff who work with psychiatric patients."

Since the incident the woman says she has had bouts of anxiety and depression, suffered from post traumatic stress disorder and had suicidal thoughts. She also says she is now afraid of being admitted to hospital.

Lawyers for the woman have entered into an agreement with Seven Oaks to discontinue the claim against the hospital citing the hospital had minimal liability.

The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (WRHA) and Seven Oaks Hospital "take the safety and security of its patients very seriously, and are aware of the case."

In a statement the WRHA said when the hospital was alerted by the patient, "Seven Oaks acted immediately by suspending the employee and notifying the Protection for Persons in Care Office (PPCO). Seven Oaks also conducted an investigation which resulted in the employee immediately being placed on leave as of February 16, 2011. As well, the hospital took steps to provide additional training and awareness to program staff about the importance and legal requirement to observe professional boundaries. This training is mandatory and provided annually."

Belgian psychiatrist Walter Vandereycken deregistered (lost his license) over sexual abuse

As seen in this report from BioEdge, a weekly newsletter about cutting-edge bioethical issues.

A Belgian psychiatrist who sexually abused a patient who subsequently sought euthanasia has been deregistered.

Walter Vandereycken’s offences surfaced in 2012 when Ann G, a woman with anorexia nervosa, accused him on Terzake, a well-known current affairs program. He was suspended from his position as a professor at the Catholic University of Leuven (KULeuven), but continued in private practice. Now he has been suspended for life from the medical profession. (See original report in BioEdge.)

Vandereycken, who is now 65, was no ordinary psychiatrist. Apart from being a sexologist, he was an international expert on anorexia (with a textbook published in English). Apparently he had been abusing patients for years; colleagues suspected, but no one blew the whistle.

When Ann G appeared on Terzake, she had apparently already requested euthanasia. Going public gave her a brief respite from "the cancer in her head". However, she was bitterly disappointed that the man who had victimised her had not been severely disciplined. Then, overseen by a kindly new psychiatrist, she exercised her option.

Oddly enough, none of the newspaper reports mentioned her death.
Terzake is a Dutch sews and current affairs TV magazine, presented by Lieven Verstraete or Annelies Beck.

Family of man who harmed himself to appeal in malpractice suit against the Vancouver Island Health Authority, an emergency-room physician and psychiatric nurse.

From a report in the Times Colonist

An appeal has been filed by a man and his family who lost a malpractice lawsuit against the Vancouver Island Health Authority, an emergency-room physician and psychiatric nurse.

Joseph Briante, represented by his mother, Carol Briante, had filed the malpractice suit alleging that a psychiatric nurse and emergency-room doctor who saw Briante failed in their psychiatric assessment and treatment.

Briante was a lawyer whose life began to spiral downward in the summer of 2007. By October, his mental health was deteriorating rapidly.

On Oct. 29, 2007, he became delusional and paranoid, and feared being monitored, sacrificed or killed, his family said in court documents.

His family rushed him to Royal Jubilee Hospital’s psychiatric emergency service. They arrived at 4:50 p.m. and Briante told the triage nurse he felt as if he was having a nervous breakdown.

Briante was discharged at 7:30 that night without seeing the on-call psychiatrist. He was referred to outpatient counselling. In a psychotic state six days later, he slashed and stabbed himself in the neck and arm with a knife, resulting in severe blood loss and cognitive impairment. He is now unable to live independently.

[...]

Briante’s family — mother Carol, father James and brother-in-law Carter Hovey — have asked the court of appeal to find that the negligence was the cause of Briante’s injuries and therefore the cause of the expense of caring for Briante and the harm the family endured.

That harm includes the psychological injury and trauma Briante’s family members experienced when the father and Hovey tried to hold him down while his mother attempted to administer mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Psychiatrists and Psychologists Are Not Reliable Expert Witnesses

As seen in this paper

(Abstract) Psychologists and psychiatrists serving as expert witnesses in court: what do they know about eyewitness memory?

(Melindera, Annika & Magnussena, Svein. Psychology, Crime and Law. Volume 21, Issue 1, 2015. DOI: 10.1080/1068316X.2014.915324)

Abstract Expert witnesses have various tasks that frequently include issues of memory. We tested if expert witnesses outperform other practitioners on memory issues of high relevance to clinical practice. We surveyed psychiatrists and psychologists who reported serving as expert witnesses in court (n = 117) about their knowledge and beliefs about human memory.

The results were compared to a sample of psychiatrists and psychologists who had never served as expert witnesses (n = 819).

Contrary to our expectations, the professionals serving as expert witnesses did not outperform the practitioners who never served. A substantial minority of the respondents harbored scientifically unproven ideas of human memory on issues such as the memory of small children, repression of adult traumatic memories, and recovered traumatic childhood memories.

We conclude that the expert witnesses are at risk of offering bad recommendations to the court in trials where reliability of eyewitness memory is at stake.
And as seen on the Mad in America Website
Psychiatrists and psychologists who work as expert witnesses for the courts are generally no more scientifically knowledgeable or accurate about issues that involve human memory than regular practitioners or lay persons, according to a study published in Psychology, Crime and Law. In some court cases, wrote the authors of the study, the results could be “catastrophic”.

The study was based on a questionnaire distributed to members of the Norwegian Psychological and Psychiatric Associations, to which about 940 professionals responded. The surveys asked questions about current scientific understandings with respect to psychological topics often relevant to court cases, especially involving factors that affect memories in victims or eyewitnesses.

“The results of the present paper show that psychologists and psychiatrists serving as expert witnesses in court have limited knowledge about factors affecting the memory of eye witnesses and memory factors in general, and they do not score above the level of psychologists/psychiatrists in general,” wrote the authors. “Moreover, a comparison with the results of samples of lay persons and judicial professional shows that they do not outperform these samples on items common to the two surveys.”

They described the overall performance of those professionals who said they’d served as expert court witnesses as “not very impressive.” At the same time, these professionals rarely indicated that they were “uncertain” about their responses.

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Healthcare Serial Killings

As seen in this longer article by Joyce Frieden, News Editor, MedPage Today

Healthcare Serial Killings

The number of serial killings committed by healthcare providers has leveled off in the U.S. in recent decades, although it is rising internationally, Eindra Khin Khin, MD, said in Chicago at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

According to the literature, the number of cases of healthcare serial killings overall rose from 10 in the 1970s to 21 in the 1980s, 23 in the 1990s, and then to 40 in the years 2000 to 2006, said Khin Khin, who along with her colleagues presented a poster on the topic.

One reason the rates of healthcare serial murders are rising internationally, but not in the U.S., is electronic medical records (EMR), Khin Khin, of George Washington University in Washington, told MedPage Today in a phone interview. She noted that several serial killers, including physician Michael Swango, first got into trouble in the U.S. and then went overseas.

"We know that in America, with the implementation of the EMR system, that really decreases the potential for these incidents," she said. "You can't just take out medications and start injecting someone; everyone's accountable because of EMR. But in most parts of world, they don't even have EMR."

"At least in the [United] States, because of incidents in 1990s and 2000s, we've really beefed up on the credentialing system, and institutions have started to communicate with each other better," she continued. "People are not shedding enough light on the international phenomenon, and the global community has a little bit to catch up on in implementing guidelines and regulatory measures."

In terms of the site, the vast majority of killings (72%) occurred in a hospital, with the remainder occurring in nursing homes (20%), patients' homes (6%) and outpatient settings (2%).

Among the killings occurring in hospitals, the biggest percentage (38%) were committed on medical/surgical units, followed by the intensive care and critical care units (18%); the rest were spread among other wards including geriatrics, pediatrics, psychiatry, neurology, and the emergency department.

As to the method used, the majority of killings -- 52% -- were done via lethal injection, followed by unknown methods (25%), suffocation (11%), and water in the lungs (4%). Air embolus and oral medications were each used in another 3%, while equipment tampering and poisoning accounted for 1% each.

Among the drugs used were opiates and opioids (23%), potassium chloride (17%), insulin (13%), and other neuromuscular-blocking drugs (9%). More than half of killers (60%) were RNs, followed by aides (18%), physicians (12%), and non-RNs (8%).

Healthcare serial killers have a variety of motivations, according to Khin Khin, including:

  • "Visionary": This rare type of serial killer is psychotic and kills in response to visions. For example, serial killer Herbert Mullin slaughtered 13 people because he thought he was preventing California from suffering an earthquake, she said.
  • "Missionary": These killers are trying to rid the world of people they see as "immoral or unworthy," Khin Khin said. One example is Thomas Cream, a physician in late 1800s England who killed the prostitutes who came to him for abortions.
  • "Thrill-Seeker": These people get a "high" from killing and are very sadistic.
  • "Lust Killer": These killers -- Swango is a good example -- get sexual pleasure from murder.
  • "Power/Control-Oriented Killer": These people kill to gain and exert power over their victims; they may have a sexual tone but they are not motivated by lust, said Khin Khin. Physician Harold Shipman is an example of this type of killer.
  • "Gain-Motivated": This group kills for psychological or tangible gain, which may come in the form of relieving a burden or in monetary profit. This can also take the form of Munchausen by proxy, such as the case of Richard Angelo, a nurse who injected patients with medications to paralyze their respiratory muscle, causing the patients to code. "When the code happened, he'd perform very well and colleagues would praise him, and he really liked that so he kept on doing it," she said.
Healthcare professionals who are concerned about a co-worker who might be involved in such activity can watch for certain "red flags," according to Khin Khin, including:
  • Unexpected deaths given patients' illnesses
  • A higher death rate with the suspect on duty
  • Multiple deaths in which the suspect is the last one seen with the victims
  • A suspect who is overly interested in death and dying
  • A suspect who is always available to "help"
  • A suspect who frequently moves from one facility to another
  • A suspect who has falsified information in the past

The researchers recommended several steps for preventing healthcare serial killings, such as educating staff members on the issue, designating a national or international regulation and monitoring body, routine institutional monitoring of high-alert medication use and monthly morality/cardiac arrest rates, and consensus guidelines for managing suspicious situations.


Unaddressed are the psychiatrists who do not kill, but instead who are content to cripple and crush the lives of their patients.

NYPD psychiatrist shot husband to start life with new lover, lawsuit claims

Snippet from a report in the New York Post

An NYPD shrink — whose job is to screen new recruits — put a bullet in her husband’s head as he slept so she could start a new life with her married lover, the wounded spouse claims in a lawsuit.

Real estate developer Kenneth Dearden Jr. accused his wife, Emily, of shooting him execution-style with an antique derringer because she “had been having an on-and-off extramarital affair since at least early 2011.”

Her lover, a Texas man named Warren Roudebush, ended his own marriage shortly before the November 2013 shooting and was pressuring Emily to do the same “so that they could be together,” according to the court papers filed last week in White Plains.

“With [Kenneth] no longer in the picture, [Emily] could avoid a contentious divorce, keep the marital home and never admit the marriage infidelity to any family and friends,” the suit says.

No one has been charged in the shooting inside the sprawling, Spanish colonial-style home that Kenneth and Emily share with their two young daughters in a posh section of Yonkers.

Yonkers police Lt. Patrick McCormack called it a “complex case” and declined to comment on Kenneth’s allegations.

The bullet that struck Kenneth entered at the back of his neck, near the base of his skull, passed underneath his ear canal and lodged in his left cheek.

He survided the shooting following surgeries to remove the bullet and to repair a severed artery to his brain.

Monday, November 17, 2014

U.S. Psychology Licensing Boards by State (Updated Listing)

Here is a list of Psychology Licensing Boards in the USA, given Alphabetically by State
  
This is contact information for state and territorial agencies responsible for the licensing and certification of psychologists throughout the U.S. listed in alphabetical order below

Please note that while we think this information is correct, that names and telephone numbers may have changed. This information may be useful if you want to file a complaint against your local psychologist.

ALABAMA
Alabama Board of Examiners of Psychologists
Address
660 Adams Ave.
Suite 360
Montgomery, Alabama 36104
Phone 

(334) 242-4127
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


ALASKA
Alaska Board of Psychologists & Psychological Associate Examiners
Address
P. O. Box 110806

Juneau, Alaska 99811-0806
Phone 
(907) 465-5470
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


ARIZONA
Arizona Board of Psychologists Examiners
Address
1400 West Washington Street, Suite 240

Phoenix, Arizona 85007
Phone 
(602) 542-8162
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


ARKANSAS
Arkansas Board of Examiners in Psychology
Address
101 East Capitol, Suite 415

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201
Phone 
(501) 682-6167
Main Page
Verify a License
Law




CALIFORNIA 
California Board of Psychology
Address
1625 North Market Blvd.
Suite N-215

Sacramento, California 95834
Phone 
(916) 574-7720
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


COLORADO
Colorado Board of Psychologists Examiners
Address
1560 Broadway, Suite 1350

Denver, Colorado 80202

Phone 
(303) 894-7768
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


CONNECTICUT
Connecticut Board of Examiners of Psychologists
Address
410 Capitol Ave. MS#12APP
P. O. Box 340308

Hartford, Connecticut 06134-8376
Phone 
(860) 509-8376
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


DELAWARE
Delaware Board of Examiners of Psychologists
Address
Cannon Building, Suite 203
861 Silver Lake Blvd.

Dover, Delaware 19904
Phone 
(302) 744-4534
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
District of Columbia Board of Psychology
Address
899 North Capitol Street, NESuite 200

Washington, District of Columbia 20002
Phone 
(202) 724-4900
Main Page
Verify a License
Rules & Regulations


FLORIDA 
Florida Board of Psychology
Address
4052 Bald Cypress Way, Bin CO5

Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3255
Phone 
(850) 488-0595
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


GEORGIA
Georgia Board of Examiners of Psychologists
Address
237 Coliseum Drive

Macon, Georgia 31217
Phone 
(478) 207-2440 
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


GUAM
Guam Board of Allied Health Examiners
Address
651 Legacy Square Commercial Complex S.
Rte. 10, Suite 9
Mangilao, Guam 96913

Phone 

(617) 735-7407
Main Page
Verify a License


HAWAII
Hawaii Board of Psychology
Address
PO Box 3469

Honolulu, Hawaii 96801
Phone 
(808) 586-2699
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


IDAHO
Idaho Board of Psychological Examiners
Address
P. O. Box 83720

Boise, Idaho 83720-0063
Phone 
(208) 334-3233
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


ILLINOIS
Illinois Psychologists Licensing Board
Address
Dept of Financial & Professional Regulation
320 W Washington Street, 3rd Floor

Springfield, Illinois 62786
Phone 
(217) 785-0800
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


INDIANA
Indiana State Psychology Board
Address
402 W Washington St., Room W072

Indianapolis, Indiana 46204
Phone (317) 232-2960
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


IOWA
Iowa Board of Psychology
Address
321 East 12th Street
Lucas State Office Bldg, 5th Floor

Des Moines, Iowa 50319-0075
Phone 
(515) 281-6352
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


KANSAS

Kansas Behavioral Sciences Regulatory Board
Address
700 SW Harrison Suite 420

Topeka, Kansas 66603
Phone 
(785) 296-3240
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


KENTUCKY
Kentucky State Board of Psychology
Address
P.O Box 1360

Frankfort, Kentucky 40602
Phone 
(502) 564-3296
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


LOUISIANA
Louisiana Board of Psychologist Examiners
Address
8706 Jefferson Highway Suite B

Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809
Phone 
(225) 925-6511
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


MAINE
Maine Board of Examiners of Psychologists
Address
35 State House Station

Augusta, Maine 04333
Phone 
(207) 624-8621
Main Page
Verify a License
Law



MARYLAND
Maryland Board of Examiners of Psychologists
Address
4201 Patterson Avenue

Baltimore, Maryland 21215
Phone (410) 764-4787
Main Page
Verify a License
Law
Rules & Regulations


MASSACHUSETTS
Massachusetts Board of Registration of Psychologists
Address
Div. of Professional Licensure
1000 Washington Street, Ste 710

Boston, Massachusetts 02118
Phone 
(617) 727-0592
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


MICHIGAN
Michigan Board of Psychology
Address
Bureau of Health Professions-Board of Psychology
P.O. Box 30670

Lansing, Michigan 48909
Phone 
(517) 335-0918
Main Page
Verify a License


MINNESOTA
Minnesota Board of Psychology
Address
2829 University Ave. SE, Ste 320

Minneapolis, Minnesota 55414
Phone 
(612) 617-2230
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


MISSISSIPPI
Mississippi Board of Psychology
Address
2395 Deerfield Road

Yazoo City, Mississippi 39194
Phone 
(888) 693-1416
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


MISSOURI
Missouri State Committee of Psychologists
Address
P.O. Box 1335
3605 Missouri Blvd.

Jefferson City, Missouri 65102
Phone 
(573) 751-0099
Main Page
Verify a License
Law



MONTANA
Montana Board of Psychologists
Address
301 S. Park Avenue, 4th FloorP.O. Box 200513

Helena, Montana 59620
Phone 
(406) 841-2394
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


NEBRASKA
Nebraska Board of Psychologists
Address
P.O. Box 94986

Lincoln, Nebraska, 68509-4986
Phone 
(402) 471-2117
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


NEVADA
Nevada Board of Psychological Examiners
Address
4600 Kietzke Lane
Bldg. E-141

Reno, Nevada 89502
Phone 
(775) 688-1268
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


NEW HAMPSHIRE
New Hampshire Board of Psychology
Address
121 South Fruit Street

Concord, New Hampshire 03301
Phone 
(603) 271-9369
Main Page
Verify a License


NEW JERSEY
New Jersey Board of Psychological Examiners
Address
P.O. Box 45017

Newark, New Jersey 07101
Phone 
(973) 504-6305
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


NEW MEXICO
New Mexico Board of Psychologist Examiners
Address
P O Box 25101

Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504
Phone 
(505) 476-4611
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


NEW YORK
New York State Board of Psychology
Address
NYS Education Department
89 Washington Avenue

Albany, New York 12234
Phone 
(518) 474-3817
Main Page
Verify a License
Law



NORTH CAROLINA
North Carolina Psychology Board
Address
895 State Farm Road, Ste 101

Boone, North Carolina 28607
Phone 
(828) 262-2258
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


NORTH DAKOTA
North Dakota Board of Psychologist Examiners
Address
P.O. Box 7042

Bismarck, North Dakota 58507
Phone 
(701) 590-1754
Main Page
Verify a License


OHIOOhio State Board of Psychology
Address
77 S. High Street, Suite 1830

Columbus, Ohio 43215-6108
Phone 
(614) 466-8808
Main Page
Verify a License
Law


OKLAHOMA
Oklahoma State Board of Examiners of Psychologists
Address
421 NW 13th Street
Suite 180
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73103

Phone 
(405) 524-9094
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OREGON
Oregon State Board of Psychologist Examiners
Address
3218 Pringle Road SE, Suite 130

Salem, Oregon 97302-6309
Phone 
(503) 378-4154
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PENNSYLVANIA
Pennsylvania State Board of Psychology
Address
P.O. Box 2649

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17105-2649
Phone 
(717) 783-4856
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PUERTO RICO
Puerto Rico Board of Psychologist Examiners
Address
P. O. Box 10200

Santurce, Puerto Rico 00908-0200
Phone 
(787) 723-2885
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RHODE ISLAND
Rhode Island Board of Psychology
Address
3 Capital Hill, Room 104

Providence, Rhode Island 02908
Phone 
(401) 222-2828
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SOUTH CAROLINA
South Carolina Board of Examiners in Psychology
Address
P. O. Box 11329

Columbia, South Carolina 29211-1329
Phone 
(803) 896-4664
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SOUTH DAKOTA
 South Dakota Board of Examiners of Psychologists
Address
810 N. Main St. #298
Spearfish, South Dakota 57783
Phone(605) 642-1600
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Rules & Regulations

TENNESSEE
Tennessee Board of Examiners of Psychology

Address
665 Mainstream Drive
2nd Floor

Nashville, Tennessee 37243 
Phone 
(615) 532-3202
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TEXAS
Texas Board of Examiners of Psychologists
Address
333 Guadalupe, Tower 2, Room 450

Austin, Texas 78701
Phone 
(512) 305-7700
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UTAH
Utah Psychology Licensing Board
Address
Div. of Occup. & Prof Licensing
160 East 300 South, 1st Floor Lobby

Salt Lake City, Utah 84111
Phone 
(801) 530-6621
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VERMONT
Vermont Board of Psychological Examiners
Address
89 Main Street3rd Floor

Montpelier, Vermont 05620
Phone 
(802) 828-2373
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VIRGIN ISLANDS
Virgin Islands Board of Psychology Examiners
Address
Office of the Commissioner
Roy O. Schneider Hospital, 9048 Sugar Estate Street

St. Thomas, Virgin Islands 00802
Phone 
(340) 776-8311
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VIRGINIA 
Virginia Board of Psychology
Address
9960 Maryland Dr., Suite 300

Henrico, Virginia 23233-1463
Phone 
(804) 367-4697
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WASHINGTON
Washington State Examining Board of Psychology
Address
P. O. Box 47877

Olympia, Washington 98507
Phone 
(360) 236-4912
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WEST VIRGINIA
West Virginia Board of Examiners of Psychologists
Address
P. O. Box 3955

Charleston, West Virginia 25339
Phone 
(304) 558-0604
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WISCONSIN
Wisconsin Psychology Examining Board
Address
P. O. Box 8935

Madison, Wisconsin 53708
Phone 
(608) 266-2112
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WYOMING
Wyoming Board of Psychology
Address
Emerson Building Room 104
2001 Capitol Avenue

Cheyenne, Wyoming 82002
Phone 
(307) 777-3507
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